Young Women's Employment


Original abstracts from the papers in the database are provided below. All abstracts are drawn directly from the papers referenced. Links to access the papers are provided, although
the papers may also be available from other web sources. By providing links to other sites, the United Nations Foundation and ExxonMobil Foundation do not guarantee, approve, or endorse the information or products available on these sites.

  • The Impact of Mexico's Retraining Program on Employment and Wages

    Revenga, Riboud, and Tan (1994)

    Original abstract:

    This paper analyzes the impact and effectiveness of the Mexican Labor Retraining Program for Unemployed and Displaced Workers (PROBECAT). The strategy followed is to compare the post- training labor market experiences of trainees with those of a comparison group--a matched sample of unemployed individuals who were eligible for, but did not participate in, the PROBECAT program. The results of this exercise suggest that participation in PROBECAT reduced the mean duration of unemployment for both male and female trainees, and increased the monthly earnings of males, but not offemales. Theresultsalsoindicatethatthepost-training earnings effect varied systematically by level of schooling attainment, with the largest earnings increases (of about 28 to 37 percent) found for males with 6 to 12 years of education.

    Intervention settings: Urban

    Intervention description: Short-term vocational education training.

    Methodology: Cox proportional hazards model estimated on participants and matched nonparticipants (based on propensity score).

    Sample: Youth and adults. Offered to 250,000 registered unemployed people age 20-55, selected on basis of eligibility index.

    Findings: Program trainees found jobs more quickly. Impacts mainly for trainees older than 25 with work experience. Cost effective for women over 25, but not for younger women.

    More Details
  • Job Generation for Young Women: Impact Evaluation of a Training and Voucher Program in Jordan

    McKenzie (2011)

    Original abstract:

    N/A

    Intervention settings: Mixed

    Intervention description: Training and vouchers.

    Methodology: RCT

    Sample: 1,395 young women college graduates.

    Findings: Results forthcoming.

    More Details
  • How Can Job Opportunities for Young People in Latin America be Improved?

    Gonzalez-Velosa et al (2012)

    Original abstract:

    Job training programs for vulnerable youth are the main response of Latin American governments to address the problem of inadequate employment opportunities for young people. Despite its importance, knowledge about these programs is scarce. This study contributes to filling this gap in the literature by presenting new evidence on the effectiveness of six of these programs operating or that were implemented in Colombia, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Dominican Republic. This analysis uses the results of impact evaluations of these programs and the results of qualitative surveys of young participants and employers, and in-depth interviews to training centers, employers and policy makers. The main results confirm the limited evidence available, namely, that these programs have little impact on the probability of getting a job (although there is a high heterogeneity in these impacts), but a significant impact on job quality. From this analysis, we propose a research agenda to improve knowledge on the functioning and impact of these programs, and provide a series of recommendations to improve the design and increase the effectiveness of youth training programs.

    Intervention settings: Mixed

    Intervention description: Vocational classroom and on-the-job training and job placement.

    Methodology: RCT

    Sample: Youth and adults. Offered to men and women 16-29 years old from lower socioeconomic strata, and those meeting educational and skill requirements of participating firms.

    Findings: 7%-12% increase in employment for women only. Three to seven hours per week increase in weekly hours worked for women only. Especially successful in countries with established private vocational training industry, significant wage employment and high female mobility.

    More Details
  • Life Skills, Employability and Training for Disadvantaged Youth: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation Design

    Ibarraran et al (2012)

    Original abstract:

    This paper presents an impact evaluation of a revamped version of the Dominican youth training program Juventud y Empleo. The paper analyzes the impact of the program on traditional labor market outcomes and on outcomes related to youth behavior and life style, expectations about the future and socio-emotional skills. In terms of labor market outcomes, the program has a positive impact on job formality for men of about 17 percent and there is also a seven percent increase in monthly earnings among those employed. However, there are no overall impacts on employment rates. Regarding non-labor market outcomes, the program reduces teenage pregnancy by five percentage points in the treatment group (about 45 percent), which is consistent with an overall increase in youth expectations about the future. The program also has a positive impact on non-cognitive skills as measured by three different scales. Scores improve between 0.08 and 0.16 standard deviations with the program. Although recent progress noted in the literature suggests that socio-emotional skills increase employability and quality of employment, the practical significance of the impacts is unclear, as there is only weak evidence that the life skills measures used are associated to better labor market performance. This is an area of growing interest and relevance that requires further research.

    Intervention settings: Mixed

    Intervention description: Vocational classroom and on-the-job training and job placement.

    Methodology: RCT

    Sample: Youth and adults. Offered to men and women 16-29 years old from lower socioeconomic strata, and those meeting educational and skill requirements of participating firms.

    Findings: 7%-12% increase in employment for women only. Three to seven hours per week increase in weekly hours worked for women only. Especially successful in countries with established private vocational training industry, significant wage employment and high female mobility.

    More Details
  • Do Labor Market Opportunities Affect Young Women's Work and Family Decisions? Experimental Evidence from India

    Jensen (2012)

    Intervention settings: Rural.

    Intervention description: Recruiters from business process outsourcing industry held information and recruitment sessions in villages.

    Methodology: RCT.

    Sample: Young women.

    Findings: Young women from these villages were significantly less likely to ge married or have children. They were also more likely to enter the labor market or obtain more schooling or postschool training.

    More Details