Women's Property Rights and Gendered Policies: Implications for Women's Long-Term Welfare in Rural Tanzania

This paper evaluates effects of community-level women's property and inheritance rights on women's economic outcomes using a 13 year longitudinal panel from rural Tanzania. In the preferred model specification, inverse probability weighting is applied to a woman-level fixed effects model to control for individual-level time invariant heterogeneity and attrition. Results indicate that changes in women's property and inheritance rights are significantly associated with women's employment outside the home, self-employment and earnings. Results are not limited to sub-groups of marginalised women. Findings indicate lack of gender equity in sub-Saharan Africa may inhibit economic development for women and society as a whole.

Peterman (2011)

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Rural.Individual-level fixed effects models with 1991-94 and 2004 Kagera Health and Development Survey.Land titling.Stronger property and inheritance rights for women are significantly associated with women's employment outside the home, self-employment and earnings. Property and inheritance rights in Tanzania were strengthened in 1999 with a land reform act that shifted the administration of land registration and titling to the village level. Women also gained land rights through the Law of Marriage Act, which allowed women to hold and sell property. However, customary law is stronger than formal laws in governing women's right to land. In local communities where cultural and economic development indicators favored women, women were more likely to be employed and to have higher earnings.http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00220381003600366#.UcHhNOevPoI