Subsidizing Vocational Training for Disadvantaged Youth in Developing Countries: Evidence from a Randomized Trial

This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized training program for disadvantaged youth introduced in Colombia in 2005. This randomized trial offers a unique opportunity to examine the impact of training in developing countries. We use originally collected data on individuals randomly offered and not offered training. The program raises earnings and employment, especially for women. Women offered training earn 18% more and have a 0.05 higher probability of employment than those not offered training, mainly in formal sector jobs. Cost- benefit analysis of these results suggests that the program generates much larger net gains than those found in developed countries.

Attanasio et al (2011) UrbanRCTThree months in-classroom training and three months of on-the-job training. Courses provided vocational skills in a diverse number of occupations (including taxi and bus drivers, office assistants, call center operators, medical assistants, textile operators, carpentry assistants, etc.) On-the-job training was provided by legally registered (formal sector) companies, via unpaid internships. Trainees received a daily stipend of $2.20 ($3 for women with children under 7).11% increase in likelihood to be in paid employment. Wage and salary earnings increase by 18%. Controlling for training institution fixed effects and pre-treatment characteristics: Female trainees' probability of paid employment 19-21 months after program increased by 5% relative to the control group. Women worked an average of 1.1 more days/month and 2.5 more hours/week than women in the control group and earned 18% more than women who didn't receive the training. Impact on total labor income not reported.http://www.povertyactionlab.org/publication/training-disadvantaged-youth-latin-a...Unemployed young people placed in lowest two deciles of income distribution.